Expanding upon the July 2024 Functional Forum about reversing cognitive decline, this podcast episode offers the full conversation between Dr. Heather Sandison and James Maskell. Dr. Sandison is the author of Reversing Alzheimer’s: The New Toolkit to Improve Cognition and Protect Brain Health.

In this episode, the guest delves deeper into the potential for functional medicine to reverse dementia, and Dr. Sandison shares her success in using a comprehensive approach to improving cognitive function for patients. She also discusses challenges and controversies surrounding this approach, including the role of mold and toxins in brain health.

This is a hopeful discussion that offers listeners:

  1. An overview of the factors that clinicans want to consider addressing with dementia patients
  2. Findings from clinical trials that use lifestyle and personalized medicine
  3. An understanding of cost saving benefits of a functional medicine approach
  4. The potential for AI to assist in supporting decision-making protocols
  5. And much more!


Brain Health: Reversing Alzheimer’s | Episode #42


Heather Sandison:
With drugs, what they do is they slow the rate of progression of the disease by 30 So you basically get worse, 30% slower. You don’t get better. There’s no pharmaceutical intervention that’s meaningful at all for improving cognition. But exercise is better alone, meditation is better alone. There’s a bunch of things that are lifestyle based that are better on their own than the medications. Then when you stack all those things, of course, as you would expect, it’s even better. So the Toups paper and their trial, what they saw was 84% of their participants got better. So they had 25 participants with MoCA scores down to 19, and they did a nine-month intervention. So those participants were less severely cognitively declined, so they had less severe disease progression, and they did a longer intervention and 84% of those participants improved.

James Maskell:
Welcome to the Evolution of Medicine podcast, the place health professionals come to hear from innovators and agitators leading the charge. We cover the latest clinical breakthroughs and health technology, as well as practical tools to help you transform your practice and the health of your community.
This podcast is brought to you by the Lifestyle Matrix Resource Center, who provide a range of options to help you deliver successful, effective functional and integrative medicine. To find out more and to get started, go to goevomed.com/lmrc. That’s goevomed.com/lmrc.

James Maskell:
Hello, and welcome to the podcast Dr. Heather Sandison. Welcome, doc.

Heather Sandison:
Thanks. So good to be here.

James Maskell:
I am really excited to talk about your new book Reversing Alzheimer’s, and I know that this is something that doesn’t come lightly and that you have put time, effort, energy and new thinking into what it’ll take to reverse this condition consistently. This is something that I have both recent and family history with that I think are very interesting and speak to some of the work and the protocol and what it takes to do it. So let’s just start from the beginning. Like you’re a naturopathic doctor. This is not the easiest part of medicine by any means. How did you end up getting sucked into the Alzheimer’s world?

Heather Sandison:
I went and did my naturopathic training and heard over and over again from well-meaning and well-educated instructors, other providers, that there was nothing you could do for Alzheimer’s or dementia and also for autism. Really, it was on that spectrum of these neurodegenerative diseases, these neurological issues that we really were in this black box of there’s nothing we can do, and to suggest that there’s hope is to give people false hope. There are doctors now calling this false hopelessness because the opposite is actually true. It’s not that there’s nothing we can do. No one should be told that at this stage there’s actually an overwhelming amount of things that we can do to optimize cognitive function at any stage. What got me excited was hearing Dr. Dale Bredesen, my mentor, speak at a conference, at a mental health conference. He was saying that you could reverse this.

At this point, he had published case studies, so there were some case series, some case studies, but there wasn’t a controlled trial. There wasn’t a trial that had happened that was really driving this home from a research perspective. It was in these early stages. Yet, the concepts made so much sense to me. What he basically was saying was, if you take a complex system like the brain, you don’t think, “Oh, misfolded proteins are the problem.” You think, “Is there enough resources there, enough energy? Is there a toxic intervention with optimal function? Is there infectious burden? Is there some sort of stressor causing this degenerative process?” When you stack all the functional medicine interventions on top of each other, these naturopathic philosophies on top of each other, what you get is better cell function and a reversal of the disease process. Now it can spiral in the other direction.

It can go downhill too. If you have high toxic burden, high infectious burden or nutrient status, diabetes, if you’ve got high stressors, if you don’t have enough social connection, if you’re isolated, if you’re not getting good sleep, these things can all stack in a negative direction and you can increase significantly your rates of cognitive decline. So these concepts and ideas, they’re common sense, just uncommon practice. When we started to put them into practice, when I, I’ll speak for myself, there’s a community of other brain docs out there doing the same thing, but when I started to put this into practice in my office, I watched people get better. Yes, we were discussing the complexity, the family dynamics, the emotional dynamics, the expense, the cost, the resource and both time and money that it takes to implement this. But when someone says, “I got my mom back,” how do you stop? How do you not continue doing the work?

James Maskell:
Yeah, it’s really amazing to bring someone back, right? It’s one thing to prevent, it’s another thing to see the lights come on again. I know that that can be addictive for clinicians, right?

Heather Sandison:
Well, yeah, absolutely. It’s why I get up in the morning. I think when I saw it happen for some of the first patients, I thought, “Gosh, this is happening for Linda,” one of my first patients who had severe Alzheimer’s, “if this is possible for her, what about everybody else who doesn’t have severe disease yet?” There’s so much suffering that we can prevent.

James Maskell:
Yeah. So let’s talk a little bit about a phrase that I’ve been hearing recently that I think is interesting is dementia denial, the idea that some of these early symptoms are on the dementia spectrum but are laughed off as a natural part of aging and that in order to really get hold of this, we need to own a little bit more of that or have that become part of a meme in society that this is the beginning of something that you can stop or you can turn around.

Heather Sandison:
Yeah, I think the problem is that the narrative has been that there’s nothing you can do. Still, I have patients show up in my office and they say, “We went to neurology, and he took away my driver’s license, told me to come back in six months, gave me some medications that he said wouldn’t work very well, and get your affairs in order. There’s nothing that can be done.” Patients are still told that. So, of course, they don’t want to go in and see someone, and it serves them to be in denial. So I think that there are two things that go on, right? One, denial because it’s shameful.

It feels shameful, especially for people who’ve depended on their intellect for their livelihood or for their identity to I imagine that they’re headed in this direction, just they can’t, they can’t go there. Then there’s also, I think, a reality too, the brain degeneration affecting self-awareness. So I think that there are people who really do think they’re on this neurodegenerative spectrum, and they are thinking that they have the cognitive capacity that they used to just because they lack self-awareness because that part of the brain has been damaged.

James Maskell:
Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, it’s a strange triangulation to try and do participatory medicine with people who are on the path to not participating. Do you think there’s like a nocebo effect happening in the neurology office too there?

Heather Sandison:
Well, this isn’t for everyone. I think that the crime is when people are told there’s no option, right?

James Maskell:
Yeah.

Heather Sandison:
And I’ve run into them, I’ve seen people who are like, “Look, I’m 85, and I just want to enjoy life. I want to have my margaritas, and I want to have my chips and guacamole. I don’t want to make the sacrifices are put in the effort at this stage. It’s not worth it to me,” and that’s okay. Of course, I want everyone to do this and live healthier, happier, more meaningful lives. But there are going to be some people who it’s just not for. What I think is important is that everyone’s told, “Okay, you can do that, and here’s this other path, and if you want it’s available to you and there’s resources and there’s support.”

James Maskell:
Yeah. Awesome. Well, let’s talk about this from the clinician point of view. So obviously there’s clinicians listening to this. I think there was a moment in 2017, 18 where this training was hot and Dr. Bredesen was partnering with IFM and doing the ReCODE training. I know a lot of doctors got excited about it because the results ere happening from a multimodal functional medicine approach. I guess maybe let’s just start with from your clinical outpatient practice and now also your inpatient work, do you want to just share a little bit about what is possible?

Heather Sandison:
Yeah. So we published last year in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease in August of 2023. We were a year after the Toups paper and Dr. Bredesen’s work, we did two very similar trials. In my trial, we took 23 participants with MoCA scores. So MoCA, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, it’s a way to assess cognition on a scale of 30. So perfect is 30, normal is 26 and above. We took participants who were between MoCA scores of 12 and 23, so below normal and so measurable cognitive impairment. We did not exclude people who had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. They were on the lower end of the spectrum. So we took participants, 23 of them between 12 and 23 on the MoCA scale, and we did a six-month intensive intervention. We had health coaches. Well, we addressed all the toxins and the infectious burden.

We did hormone replacement for almost everyone as appropriate, of course, and we did the Bredesen approach. We basically took all of naturopathic medicine, all of functional medicine and threw it at these participants for six months. What we saw was a statistically significant increase in the means of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment of the MoCA scores and the Cambridge Brain Sciences testing. In overall composite cognition and memory we saw increases in verbal ability and attention, I think, and reasoning. There’s a couple other categories that we saw increases in, but not statistically significant across all 23 participants. 17 of the 23 participants, or 74% improved their cognition. So not everybody, but 74%, which is three quarters of the time.

James Maskell:
Just for context, that’s not possible with drugs, right?

Heather Sandison:
With drugs, what they do is they slow the rate of progression of the disease by 30%. So you basically get worse, 30% slower. You don’t get better. There’s no pharmaceutical intervention that’s meaningful at all for improving cognition. But exercise is better alone, meditation is better alone. There’s a bunch of things that are lifestyle based that are better on their own than the medications. Then when you stack all those things, of course, as you would expect, it’s even better. So the Toups paper and their trial, what they saw was 84% of their participants got better. So they had 25 participants with MoCA scores down to 19, and they did a nine-month intervention. So those participants were less severely cognitively declined, so they had less severe disease progression, and they did a longer intervention and 84% of those participants improved. So they got a little bit better outcomes, but it was a little bit easier. They were less progressed and they had a longer intervention. We both did these trials during COVID, so we might expect that in a post-COVID world, we would get maybe even slightly better results.

James Maskell:
Why is a naturopathic or a functional medicine doctor more likely to get these outcomes than a neurologist or someone who isn’t trained in these modalities or those fundamental outcomes pieces?

Heather Sandison:
So a neurologist wants to help, no one goes into medicine with the idea that they’re going to have these seven-minute visits and only have a tool belt that includes medications and potentially surgery. The system is not created to have these 90-minute visits or hour-long visits where you can dig into the why. So if we think about neurodegeneration, yeah, people will say, “Oh, it’s caused by inflammation,” but what caused the inflammation that we want to dig into those causal level issues, toxicity, stress structure, nutrients, signaling, infections. These things are what cause the imbalances or imbalances in them cause the inflammation, cause the neurodegeneration, and that is what functional medicine and naturopathic doctors are trained in. We go through years of training to identify those toxins, those infections, those nutrient imbalances, and we see that that’s when people get the benefit is when we apply those concepts and those labs and optimize for that.

James Maskell:
That’s interesting. Okay. So what would you say, obviously, in the last five years, some people have been able to get those kind of outcomes by following some of those strategies and maybe a lot of people have not been able to get those outcomes. I know one of the things that Dr. Bredesen did in the early years was to track all the outcomes across all the people that were doing the protocol. I guess I’m just wondering what do you think from your own perspective now having done it and now training other doctors to do it, what are some of the critical things that your patients are getting that are driving those outcomes that maybe others who have tried to execute on this have not been able to get done?

Heather Sandison:
That’s a great question, and I’m not sure that I fully know the answer. I wish I did. There is a way to just make this all easy. I would be sharing that with you, but I think that participant or patient, in our case at Marama, it’s resident, they need to be willing to participate. They need to be willing to make changes, and we’re just pushing a rock uphill if they’re not engaged in the changes and willing to do that. There’s a lot of dynamics at play. I’ve seen patients where they show up, it’s a husband and wife and they show up and she’s got dementia, and she’s aware and wants to do it. That self-awareness piece, that’s a really good indicator too. If someone’s aware of their disease process, they’re much more motivated to make changes.

If they’re not aware, it’s harder to get them to change their diet, change their exercise habits, change their sleep. I’ve seen participants or patients where the spouse is undermining or the adult child is undermining the process, the participant or the patient who’s struggling is aware and wants to do it, but then they have happy hour every day and drink alcohol and they can’t get into ketosis because people are leaving apples or cookies around. So they’re not supported. So when someone has a perfect cognition, it’s hard to make lifestyle changes around diet and exercise and our habits. When they have cognitive decline, it’s even harder, and so they need support. Having that support is important.

James Maskell:
Yeah, absolutely. Well, I wanted to share just a little bit recently I’ve had an experience with my own father where he went into severe cognitive decline and has come back, which is very unlikely, obviously. But it was interesting that it was predicted. It was predicted by my Dr. Christine Burke and my friend Dr. Nicole Shorrock, who are both working with brain issues, just like you said at the different ends of the spectrum. Dr. Shorrock’s a pediatrician. Dr. Burke is a specialist in cognitive decline. They best said, “Look, if it happens that quickly, you should look for infection,” went there, saw the mold, witnessed the mold, and he’s been out of a moldy environment now for 4 1/2 months and has come back, I would say without a lot of cognitive-enhancing protocols and binders and all the things that you might do, but just being in a new environment.

It’s interesting because my understanding is that because of the controversy of mold, however controversial you think it is or not, that’s part of the reason why there hasn’t been more of a push towards education in this area because it’s not… I guess the question I have for you is how tricky is it being at the beginning of a movement that has so much promise and you can see that it works, but at the same time, you’re stuck in the system where even the people who think you think should be very much supporting are put off because of some of the controversial elements like mold might play a role, which your average neurologist is not going to be down with that.

Heather Sandison:
By the time people see me, they’re outside of the system. They aren’t really relying on their neurologist to come up with solutions. Now, I think it’s important for someone to see a neurologist because for instance, normal pressure hydrocephalus is a treatable condition. You can put a shunt in, which is not a small thing, but if you put a shunt in and someone gets the extra serial spinal fluid out and they can walk and they don’t have incontinence and they have their memory back, by all means, make sure that they get that treatment and that they get workup for that. So that can be helpful with getting imaging through a neurologist is extremely valuable. Now, when it comes to all of the other causal level factors, neurology is not going to take the time to go through that and they just don’t have access, right? They don’t have access to urinary mycotoxin testing and heavy metal testing the way that we would do it. They just don’t have that. It’s not in their wheelhouse.

So we’re asking somebody to do something that they just don’t have the ability to do if we expect that from neurology. That’s not where this is going to be housed. It’s not going to live in a neurology practice probably, at least the way that they look right now. Now, Dr. Bredesen and I are both working with the Pacific Neuroscience Institute and their brain health program, and we hope, part of the reason why I’m putting a lot of effort into that collaboration is because it becomes a model through Providence and St. John. So it’s in a huge health organization. Now they are funded by philanthropy, they have an endowment, and that makes it easier to add functional medicine ’cause it’s not just based on reimbursement, insurance reimbursement. But our goal explicitly there is to create a model that can be replicated at Mayo or replicated at Johns Hopkins or replicated at another place where we can bring functional medicine into the existing structure and have it make sense at some level.

I think if we can continue to show outcomes, well, it’s very clear, Marama, a residential care facility, I was just explaining before we started recording, it’s extremely labor-intensive to care for someone with dementia and Alzheimer’s. Think of your kids and how hard it is to take care of an infant, it’s that, but it’s magnified because it’s this large adult who requires 24-hour care, who’s up all night, not sleeping, who can be combative, who can be very unpredictable, who can wander off and not be safe. It’s very intensive, and it’s expensive, extremely expensive. Memory care in the U.S., I think the average is between 6 and $8,000. Here in California it’s closer to 10. At Marama, we start our bases at between 12,500 and 15,000 depending on what’s going on for that person, per month. That’s a per-month cost. This is very, very expensive. So people are looking for solutions to prevent decline and to prevent the need for memory care because it is so expensive and it’s much less costly to find a functional medicine doctor and to do this work, especially if they’re getting relatively good outcomes.

James Maskell:
Yeah, exactly. Well, look, I’d love to get your vision here because I see all the things that you’ve got going on. You’ve got a book which is out now or out what, June 11th? Anyone can read that and they can read it and see that it’s possible. There’s probably some part of the population that can execute off a book, but you’ve also got your inpatient residential facilities. You’ve got this effort that you’re now doing with Dale to execute inside a health system with a hope that it can be replicated. Give us the 10-year outlook. Give us the 10-year outlook of if everything that you are doing is successful and things start to move in this direction, how do you see it? How do you see the progress of the medicine that can reverse, and how do people end up getting it?

Heather Sandison:
Yeah, I think that if we’re successful in 10 years, no one believes there’s nothing you can do for dementia. They might not choose to take the option to do something about it, but everyone in the US has some… their thought process when the word dementia or Alzheimer’s comes up isn’t terror. It’s not, “Oh, my God, this is a one-way street. There’s nothing that can be done.” It, “Okay, it’s time to start making these better health decisions.” That would be success. I think from a residential perspective, right now at Marama, we have a facility here in San Diego and another one in Kansas, and people are moving from Florida and from New York and from all over.

I want people to not even in 50 years for memory care to be obsolete, for there to be memory recovery centers, but not memory care facilities where people just go downhill. I would love for them to have one in every major city so that you don’t have to move your mom across the country. She can be down the street and you can still be very involved in her care. Then she moves home, she moves back into her independent living scenario, whatever that looks like, and she’s able to stay involved in church and then with grandkids and with her friends, and she stays involved in the fabric of her community and contributes to that versus being siloed away in a memory care facility. Then I would love for every major hospital system, every major provider system to have functional medicine integrated into their brain health clinics.

James Maskell:
Yeah. Well, I’d love to just, I guess, there’s one layer down from what you’re talking about, which is the lifestyle medicine for brain health. Is it called the FINGER study? Is that the one that came out? I think it was 10 years ago-

Heather Sandison:
Yeah. Yeah-

James Maskell:
… and that one was pretty basic. It’s like, “Hey, do some lifestyle changes and you can improve your brain health.” Obviously, what we are talking about here is another layer, getting into the toxins, getting into the infections, getting into the downstream effects of the metabolic dysfunction that ends up in those kind of things. So it seems to me that there’s two layers happening. There’s the underlying layer of, hey, you can avoid that… this is the, I would say, the Max Lugavere layer, which is eat some kimchi and whatever, and you could reduce your chances of getting it. But this is a new layer that that Dr. Bredesen is pioneering, and you’re pioneering Dr. Burke and the other doctors that are in that dementia trial are leading on. It does seem that there’s another layer of health available.

Heather Sandison:
Absolutely. I couldn’t agree more, and I think for many people, of course, reversing Alzheimer’s like the name of my book, it’s very bold. Yet it’s time to shift the conversation from this conservative, oh, maybe we can do some things to prevent it, to actually, we can optimize cognitive function in the prevention stage, in the early stage. Even in the more severe stages, although it’s much harder, it takes more resource, but there are people with severe Alzheimer’s who we have seen get better. So yes, there needs to be more research. Yes, we need to dive into that further.

Dr. Bredesen wants to do the Sarah trial. I’m sure you’ve heard about this, the severe Alzheimer’s reversal attempt and basically, just take a handful of people with single digit MoCAs and see what the data would look like. Now, I’ve had a handful of patients already who have had single-digit MoCAs who we’ve seen improve. They’re not necessarily going back to work, but they get language back to say, “I’m hungry, I’m cold.” They get relationships back. They’re able to speak in complete sentences. They’re there. They’re present, versus in that glazed, absent state, probably like what you saw with your dad, and that’s possible. Now, it’s not necessarily probable, but everyone should know that it’s possible.

James Maskell:
Yeah. Well, I love Dale’s pioneering work and the way that he thinks, let’s go after the hardest and see what’s happened. I love that. I guess I just want to finish off by giving you, I don’t know, have you seen Max’s film Little Empty Boxes?

Heather Sandison:
I haven’t seen it yet, but I’m excited to.

James Maskell:
Well, I was excited when it happened, and I love Max. He’s been a friend for a long time, and he came on one of the earliest functional forums to talk about the fact that this project was ongoing. One of the things that you’ll probably in the film is that everyone in the functional medicine world who’s interviewed looks like they’ve aged backwards because I know he shot all that footage in like 2014, ’15, ’16. Mark Hyman and Perlmutter, whatever, they don’t look the same as they did 10 years ago, which is, for someone who knows, it’s funny. But I have to say on reflection two weeks after watching it, I’m actually sad about it because I feel like he made a hopeless film in a situation where there’s actually a lot of hope.

I know that his situation is specific because his mom had Lewy body dementia, and maybe across the different forms of dementia, that’s not as easy or as likely to move back in the other direction, if at all. But I left from it saying, “Okay, here we have a moment where there’s a movie that’s being made that features functional medicine people in there, but there’s no real message of hope in it at all.” I was like, “The message of hope needs to come out.” That’s why I was excited to see the title of your book because it’s like, if nothing else, it’s hopeful that this is happening. It was just a bit sad afterwards to realize that it was a very actually hopeless film in my estimation.

Heather Sandison:
Oh, that’s heartbreaking. Lewy body, we had one participant in the trial, this is anecdotal, ’cause it’s just one gentleman, but he never did get into ketosis, but he stayed stable for those six months that he was in the trial. I think with Lewy body, what comes up is the behavioral piece is a lot harder. So one of the things that increases our confidence is when someone’s aware of their disease process that we see with Lewy body, a lot of people are unaware. There’s a lot of paranoia, there’s hallucinations. There’s a typical presentation behaviorally that makes it harder to integrate the strategies for reversal, but not impossible.

James Maskell:
Yeah. Well, look, everyone’s playing their part. I want to honor the role that you’re playing and just leading the charge. I think that there’s some very exciting times ahead here, even if it’s the very, very beginning of a movement. So it’s like the numbers and the access is not quite where we want it to be, but I think that there’s some exciting moments ahead because you’ve got that trial. I know for instance, I’ll just say, part of the reason why I was excited about group visits is that two years before they published the Cleveland Clinic group visit study, I saw Mark present and IHS and shared the outcomes. I was like, “Oh, this is a big deal, that this kind of outcomes or these outcomes were achieved without a doctor and without tons of functional medicine training. It was just like doing the right things in the right order with the right structure.”

When I was going down to watch Max’s film with Dr. Burke we’re sitting in the back of the car, and the six of those groups that are running those trials have a WhatsApp group or a text thread where they’re just saying, “Hey, guess what happened to this patient and that patient?” I think in that group, Dr. Burke holds the record for the highest MoCA improvement, which was eight, which is amazing. 8 out of 30 is ridiculous. That’s a full reversal. A text came in while we were there with one of the other PIs staring that she had just got the outcome from someone who’d come through and had also got 8, I think from 19 to 27. So it’s like you’re sitting in that moment, you’re sitting in the back of the car and you’re like, “Holy shit, this is the beginning of something, and this is really happening.”

So it’s exciting to know that we’re definitely a little ahead of the curve, and obviously that research will get published at some point. The fact that I’ve met all six of those people and they’re all extremely proficient and good at what they do, and I think we’ve got our best foot forward as an industry with that stuff, and obviously, they’re all there because of Dale’s mentorship and generosity and all the amazing things that he is as a person and as a leader, so I’m excited to see. I hope that in 10 years we can see a lot more access, a lot more success and the cultural movement that you described.

Heather Sandison:
Yeah, I’m very hopeful. It’s kind of funny, ’cause I hear your perspective being a little bit like, “Gosh, why isn’t it more hopeful and why aren’t we further ahead? There’s still so much to do.” My head is so down and in it every day, and I see so much success that it’s almost odd to me that people… I just take it for granted at this point. It is, “This train has left the station, we’re going.”

James Maskell:
Well, for my dad’s situation, just because of who my dad was, we ended up within a week of me being down there with an 85-person WhatsApp group looking for updates on my dad. I can just see that off the back of this, there’s a lot of interest in the fact that, hang on a minute, they’re all of a certain age. My dad’s probably a decade older than most of them just because of how his life unfold. But I know there’s a lot of 70 year olds there, and there’s a lot of 65 to 80 year olds in that group who are paying attention to this go, “Hang on a minute, I never heard of this. I never heard of a rapid decline and it coming back and what’s going on.”

So I think we have something to work with here, and it’s just a question of trying to make it easy for people to participate, and we’ll see. But yeah, thank you for all your pioneering work. If you’re listening to this, check out the book. This would be a great book to have in your clinic to pass out to patients. I’m sure that there’s practitioners who are listening to this who like to stay in their lane and know that this is not their lane. There are referral sources and tools like your centers where people can come and be residents, so look forward to seeing what happens from here. But Dr. Sandison, pleasure to be with you on the Evolution of Medicine Podcast. Thank you.

Heather Sandison:
James, such a privilege. Thanks for having me.

James Maskell:
All right, this has been The Evolution of Medicine Podcast. We’ve been talking about reversing Alzheimer’s with Dr. Heather Sandison. Thanks so much for tuning in, and we’ll see you next time. Hello and welcome to the podcast. This week we are going to be talking about reversing Alzheimer’s with Dr. Heather Sandison. Over the 40 minutes, we talked about some of the most interesting areas in this topic, why functional naturopathic medicine doctors are getting the best outcomes and what’s happening in the world of reversing Alzheimer’s. We talk about her book, we talk about the outcomes that are possible, and we talk about a vision for where this could go in the next 10 years. Really excited to be sharing this kind of information and feeling very energized by this conversation, particularly given some of my own personal journey here, and really excited for this podcast. So enjoy.

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